The Award

The Daylight Award honours and supports daylight research and daylight in architecture, for the benefit of human health, well-being and the environment. The award puts specific emphasis on the interrelation between theory and practice.

The Daylight Award is given every second year in two categories; Daylight Research and Daylight in Architecture.

The award is given as two personal prizes, and each to the sum of €100,000

The Daylight Award honours and supports daylight research and daylight in architecture, for the benefit of human health, well-being and the environment. The award puts specific emphasis on the interrelation between theory and practice.

The Daylight Award is given every second year in two categories; Daylight Research and Daylight in Architecture.

The award is given as two personal prizes, and each to the sum of €100,000

1. Daylight Research

The Daylight Award for Research is awarded to individuals or smaller groups of scientists who have distinguished themselves as outstanding contributors to internationally recognised daylight research. It acknowledges highly original and influential advances in the areas of natural science, human science or social science, with special emphasis on the effects of daylight on human health, well-being and performance.

2. Daylight in Architecture

The Daylight Award for Architecture is awarded to one or more architects or other professionals who have distinguished themselves by realising architecture or creating urban environments that showcase unique use of daylight. Special emphasis will be put on architecture that considers the overall quality of life, its impact on human health, well-being and performance, and its value to society.

The Daylight Award is presented by the non-profit, private charitable foundations, VILLUM FONDEN, VELUX FONDEN and VELUX STIFTUNG, established by Villum Kann Rasmussen. The foundations support a wide range of non-profit purposes, in scientific, social, cultural and environmental projects.

The three foundations have a long history when it comes to awarding best practice in daylight. Since 1980, they have awarded daylight prizes to, among others, Jørn Utzon (DK) (1980), Henning Larsen (DK) (1987), Bob Gysin (CH) (2007), Richard Perez (USA) (2008), Peter Zumthor (CH) (2010), James Carpenter (USA) (2010), Lacaton & Vassal (F) (2011), Gigon & Guyer (CH) (2012) and SANAA (JP) (2014).

The jury shall represent the highest possible level of expertise in the field of daylight research and daylight architecture, including relevant and comprehensive knowledge of the international scientific and architectural world. In terms of merit, recognition and knowledge, the members areexpected to be outstanding and highly respected by the international community.

The jury comprises at least six and no more than nine members. The jury should have members from at least three different countries and should not have more than two members from the same country.

For the 2016 award, the foundations behind The Daylight Award have drawn up a list of named experts in the fields of daylight research and daylight in architecture who proposed the candidates for the jury.